When life gives you lemons, make lemonade

Since mid-March 2020, students, parents and educators have been developing ways to ensure a continuity of learning for all students. However, in the uncertainty of the continuing pandemic, 65% of parents worry “whether their children will stay on track and be prepared for the next grade”, with 60% believing school closures will have a negative impact on their kid’s education,…

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Learning to be self-directed

With school closures and the substitution of distance learning, every student is learning to be self-directed, rather than teacher-guided or parent-approved. Although parents worry their children are falling behind, maybe they’re actually catching up, trying to reconnect with their authentic selves, discover more about their interests and aptitudes, which unfortunately, students can lose, in the busy-ness of regular school work…

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Lessons to Learn from The Stanford Experience, Part 2

Students are transforming how they imagine their college experiences and reimagining their relationship with their university. Suddenly, with shifts to online learning and for many students, the eviction from on-campus residences, like those at Stanford, the loss of access to libraries, tutoring centers, guest lectures, panel discussions, late-night dorm conversations about the meaning of the universe, the list goes on,…

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Who’s the Class Clown?

Teachers got jokes Some advice for those students wanting to be the next Jack Ryan: If you’re looking to hide top secret information, insert it into a syllabus or an assignment’s instructions. No one will ever read it. — Typical EduCelebrity (@EduCelebrity) December 2, 2019 And, just to shake things up for those parents who religiously check their kids’ online…

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Can I Change My 650 Word Common Application Essay After Submitting It?

The short answer is yes…with an *.  [See Below] But, like any life-impacting decision, the short answer doesn’t account for the complexities of choosing a college.  And, those last three words are key to keep in mind:  YOU, the applicant, are the one who’s doing the choosing of the college.  However, most college applicants skip that fact and believe the college…

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College Application or Marriage Proposal?

Applying to college isn’t simple.  Metaphorically, choosing a college can be like an arranged marriage—parents are involved in the choosing process, lifelong expectations are being weighted and future prosperity is being forecasted. “Dowries” are paid in the form of tuition, room and board, books etc.   Students seek a college that’s the “right fit“, dating campuses on tour after tour…

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Let Your Light Shine.CMC

Knowledge Doesn’t Belong to Just Any One Person

Below is an excerpt from the May 2017, National Geographic Magazine, where Paleoanthropologist Lee Berger, discusses the need for frank discussion and collaboration amongst everyone, not just scientists and academics, in order to advance human knowledge. Doesn’t publishing your raw data invite premature criticism?  Yes, there’s is public criticism, but that’s peculiar to any science in transition.  The philosophy behind…

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Early Admissions: “The New Normal”

In what’s increasingly becoming an “Arms Race” of admissions, more and more students are applying early admissions.  The higher admit rates during early admissions in comparison with the regular decision period seemingly indicates greater chances for admissions.  For the current Class of 2021, 14.5% of Early Action applicants to Harvard were admitted, while during Regular Decision, only 5.1% of the…

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“Free” Speech?

Debate, questioning, argument are central to education.  From Aristotle to John Dewey, educational theorists and teachers have long touted the benefits resulting from the meaningful dialogue, including a spectrum of viewpoints.  Yet, given today’s increasingly polarized society, educators, like Dr. John Etchemendy former provost of Stanford University, are making public declarations warning, beseeching students, faculty and society at large that the…

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Mind the Gap

Malia Obama recently became a famous representative of a Millennial trend, The Gap Year.  Defined as a “year-off” between high school and starting college, most “Gap Year-ians” aren’t just loafing around, playing video games and drinking Bobo teas all day.  For a generation raised on scheduled play-dates, year-round athletics, and regimented community service activities, the gap year is similarly purposeful…

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Adverbial Perils

Very, greatly, really, extremely, strongly, deeply…the adverb can seem genuine and necessary for emphasis in a college essay, yet can actually have the opposite effect of watering down what is described.  Plus, the adverb can be an extraneous word in the precious word count of the college essay.  Yet, teenage college essay writers typically include multiple adverbs in their first…

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