Tag: College Admissions Decisions

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Guest Post: Inside the mind of your average high school senior post-applications

By Sanika, an anxious yet sentimental senior from the Class of 2019 Post application period is a very odd, stressful and overall confusing time. As you hear your friends get acceptances into top IVY’s or UC’s  while you on the other hand hear literally nothing from schools, it’s hard to not feel like this: But, …

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Only 2.43% Made the Cut

By definition, “highly selective college admissions” means more applicants denied than accepted. Harvard’s admissions results put the exclamation mark on the above statement. 98% or 40,003 people, a combination of “36,119 regular decision applicants, plus the 4,882 students deferred in the early action process” were denied admissions for Fall 2018. And, before assuming that applying Early …

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What If’s?

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The What If’s seem more than the I Know’s when applying to college.  While teens are the ones applying to college, parents have their own unique doubts, as they watch from the sidelines while their seniors complete college applications. Work colleagues who often share their opinions about college can further fuel parents’ second-guessing.   But, just …

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Depth Over Breadth?

“Well-lopsided” is the new catchphrase in college admissions. In CMC’s recent conversation with an Ivy League admissions officer, she mentioned that the trend for applicants are either well-rounded, with depth in each activity or well-lopsided—which means if applicants are going to focus on one activity, like a sport, Olympic training should be in view for such a candidate. In …

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MIT Admissions Honors Pi Day

In an annual homage to Pi Day (3.14), MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) releases their admissions decisions.  So, on Monday, 3.14.16 at 6:28 pm ET in a galaxy close, close to you, check decisions.mit.edu Related PostsThe “Inside” Track on College Admissions, Especially To The Ivy League Fall 2012 UC Admissions More Competitive for Freshmen The Deceptive (And …