Diminished Learning from a Distance

The 2020-21 virtual K-12 schooling experiment, born of necessity from the wholesale disruption of the modern educational process and haphazardly planned and implemented by an institutional elite that does not have to practice managing entrepreneurially since the educational industry is relatively monopolistic, is failing for a variety of reasons.  Although I admit that the sample of students I’ve polled (public…

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Grade Inflation Exposed

I often listen to students’ and parents’ worries about high school grades that are any other letter but an A. The A grade has become synonymous with “smart”, “the key to college acceptances” and “bragging rights”.  But, in the quest to “achieve”, often the confidence in knowing oneself and one’s strengths, so as to boldly walk into adulthood with a…

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Part 2: Learning May Not Be Simple–The Student’s Perspective

In Part One of our “Learning May Not Be Simple” series, we discussed the complexities of presenting new information in an average classroom, as well as how a teacher’s management of the class can influence the learning process.  The following highlights the student’s perspective and the complications of understanding new information, particularly for high school students, who are subject to…

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The Complexities of Learning, Part 1

Learning at school can seem like a simple equation: teacher presents material + students listen (including taking notes) + students complete the homework assignments and tests = learning.  Yet, in practice, learning can be more complex.  The following is the first in an on-going series of posts that will discuss the intricacies of learning in contemporary classrooms.

The Classroom Transition from Anonymity to Known

The dictionary defines teaching as, “showing or explaining”, and explain in its simplest terms is “to make clear, make plain.”  Making plain takes time and a dialogue to be sure each person within the exchange is in agreement, so with a class of 35 students and one teacher, one can come up with creative ways to “check for understanding”–hand signals,…

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