Graduated, Yet Still Not Grown Up?

Parents want what’s best for their children.  Yet, what is the cost of  “the best” for both parent and child? A recent Ameriprise Financial study found the following amongst Baby Boomer Parents (born between 1946-1964) 55% allowed their adult children to move home rent free 71% paid college tuition Yet, 34% say that helping children has slowed down saving for…

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California’s Budget Shortfalls: Consider the Immediate and Long Term Effects

Although California’s budget is challenging CSU officials to “live within it’s means” in the short term, forgoing expenses today can affect the long term quality of education and how the CSU  educates students in the future. Delaying purchases on library materials today can affect the resources available to future students, and coupled with phasing out less-popular academic departments can limit…

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Dropping wages = shrinking prosperity?

According the the Economic Policy Institute, from 2002-2012: For male workers: With a college degree:  hourly wages dropped 11% to $21.68 With a high school diploma: hourly wages dropped 10% to 11.68 For female workers: With a college degree: hourly wages dropped 7.6% to $18.80 With a high school diploma: hourly wages dropped 9.2% to $9.92 All wages are adjusted…

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California’s Budget Shortfalls: Opportunity for Improvement?

The reported $3 Billion shortfall in tax revenues for California may mean: Increases to tuition and fees at community colleges, CSU and UC campuses–expanding the overall cost of a college degree in California Continued cuts to services, like counseling and librarians, for K-12 schools. Families may have to increase their volunteer hours to fund-raise for extracurricular activities and sports at…

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College Degree’s Changing Value

As an update to a recent post, several recent studies show a growing number of children who earned less education than their parents, reversing the trend since 1876.  Does this current trend mean a decrease in the living standard of Americans overall, since currently people with bachelor’s degrees earn more over their lifetime, than those with a high school diploma?

Lower Student Loan Interest Today = Future National Debt Costs?

In an earlier post, we mentioned the continued political debate about maintaining the current student loan interest rates at 3.4%, instead of the increase to 6.8%, if Congress doesn’t come to consensus before July 1, 2012.   Mark Kantrowitz of FinAid and the Wall Street Journal debate whether the short term gain of low student interest rates, just means the current…

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House Votes to Keep Student Loan Interest Rates Low for 2012-13: A Good Move?

The Wall Street Journal reported that the House today passed a resolution to keep the current interest rate on student Stafford loans at 3.4% for the 2012-13 school year.   The Senate is scheduled to vote on a similar bill on May 8th.  Without Congressional consensus, student loan interest rates will increase to 6.8% for the 2012-13 school year. While interest…

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Fall 2012 UC Admissions More Competitive for Freshmen

The University of California released their admissions numbers for Fall 2012 Freshmen last week.   The uncertainty in the state budget and record number of applications  or Fall 2012 Freshmen admissions created additional competition and subjectivity in the admissions process.   UC Davis Chancellor, Linda Katehi, recently stated: UC Davis refused [Fall 2012] admissions to 1500 or more students with a 4.0…

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More on Financial Aid & College Affordability

Here’s a few tips when choosing colleges for application and enrollment, and simultaneously determining how your family will afford the costs: Calculate all 4 or 5 years of costs when determining the affordability of college, not just the first year. College costs during a student’s senior year in college are likely to be at least one-fifth higher than during the…

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Financial Aid: There is No Free Lunch

There is no-magic-bullet-one-time-conversation-painless-and-costless solution to paying for college.  Increasing the amount of financial aid–either need based or merit based–are multiple year efforts that extend through a student’s entire college career.  Basically, there is no free lunch. Moving equity from one’s home to a life insurance policy or rolling all savings into retirement accounts are strategies may have greater costs to…

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Considering Universities as Idea Makers to Select Colleges

Research and exploring ideas aren’t usually at the top priority of a student or their parents in choosing a college.   “Getting a good job” or “moving away from home” are more common criteria for choosing colleges.  However, universities are incubators for new knowledge.  (Think: Google, which emerged from graduate work at Stanford )  Knowing the opportunities for students to participate…

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